Category: BIO003000

Nice is Not a Biscuit

100 lessons from one of Britain’s most successful businessmen

Peter Mead’s spectacular career in advertising began when he joined the despatch department of a large agency straight from school at the age of 16. He fell in love with the business and his ambition and drive led him in 1977 to co-found Abbott Mead Vickers, which grew into one of the industry’s most respected and highly awarded agencies. In 1995 AMV BBDO became the largest advertising agency in the UK, a position it has held ever since.

Nice is not a Biscuit distils the most important business lessons Peter has learnt from his years at the cutting edge of advertising. It reveals the secrets of his success, and a lifetime’s thought about the right way to do business in the creative industries (and beyond), in a series of short, utterly beguiling chapters.

The chapters range over leadership, happy companies; speaking truth to power; class; ambition and the pursuit of scale; politicking in the workplace; improving profitability, managing creative types, and lots more. He also includes inside stories of some of the most iconic advertising in the last forty years.

The book places the reader in the company of a clever, funny, wise, humane raconteur, whose vast knowledge is conveyed lightly, and in ways that make the reader want to listen and learn.

When In Doubt Be Nice

Peter Mead’s spectacular career in advertising began when he joined the despatch department of a large agency straight from school at the age of 16.

He fell in love with the business and his ambition and drive led him in 1977 to co-found Abbott Mead Vickers, which grew into one of the industry’s most respected and highly awarded agencies. In 1995 AMV BBDO became the largest advertising agency in the UK, a position it has held ever since.

When in Doubt Be Nice begins with the most important business lessons Peter has learnt from his years at the cutting edge of advertising, and tells how he became one of the legends of the industry. It reveals the secrets of his success, his beliefs about the right way to do business and the values on which he built his remarkable career, including the benefits of behaving not simply as a leader to those who work closely with him, but also as a guide and mentor.

Written with modesty and wit, it is an inspiring insight into the mind of a great businessman who used intuitive flair and an understanding of how those around him think to build and run an extraordinarily successful advertising agency.

Return To The Little Kingdom

Almost thirty years ago, Michael Moritz, then a young journalist at ‘Time’ magazine, was allowed exclusive access to the inner workings of a cutting-edge technology company to tell the story of its first decade in business. ‘The Little Kingdom: The Private Story of Apple Computer’ brought readers into the childhood homes of Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, showed how they dropped out of college and founded Apple in 1976, and charted the company s rise from basement brainstorming to colossal empire. Now, after spending almost twenty-five years at Sequoia Capital, the much admired private investment partnership, Moritz, who has since served as a board member of a remarkable list of important companies including Yahoo!, Google and PayPal, offers his contemporary perspective on the accomplishments of Steve Jobs and the extraordinary comeback of Apple in this revised edition of his now-classic work. Required reading for anyone who has ever listened to music on an iPod, downloaded an app onto an iPhone, browsed on a Mac, or is curious about the distinctive attributes of enduring companies, ‘Return to the Little Kingdom’ is the only book that explains how Steve Jobs came to found the company that changed our world – twice.

Buffett

Starting from almost nothing, simply by picking stocks and companies for investment, Warren Buffett has amassed an astonishing fortune – a net worth of $64 billion and counting. His awesome investment record has made him a cult figure popularly known for his seeming contradictions: he is a billionaire with a modest lifestyle, a phenomenally successful investor who eschews the revolving-door trading of modern Wall Street, a brilliant dealmaker who cultivates a homespun aura. Journalist Roger Lowenstein draws on three years of unprecedented access to Buffett’s family, friends and colleagues to provide this definitive inside account of the life and career of a true American original. He explains Buffett’s investment strategy – a long-term philosophy grounded in buying stock in companies that are undervalued on the market and hanging on until their worth invariably surfaces – and shows how it is a reflection of the character of the man himself. And in a brand new afterword, in the wake of the news that Buffett has decided to give the bulk of his fortune to the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation, Lowenstein reflects on the largest charitable donation in American history.