Category: DNC

Nice is Not a Biscuit

100 lessons from one of Britain’s most successful businessmen

Peter Mead’s spectacular career in advertising began when he joined the despatch department of a large agency straight from school at the age of 16. He fell in love with the business and his ambition and drive led him in 1977 to co-found Abbott Mead Vickers, which grew into one of the industry’s most respected and highly awarded agencies. In 1995 AMV BBDO became the largest advertising agency in the UK, a position it has held ever since.

Nice is not a Biscuit distils the most important business lessons Peter has learnt from his years at the cutting edge of advertising. It reveals the secrets of his success, and a lifetime’s thought about the right way to do business in the creative industries (and beyond), in a series of short, utterly beguiling chapters.

The chapters range over leadership, happy companies; speaking truth to power; class; ambition and the pursuit of scale; politicking in the workplace; improving profitability, managing creative types, and lots more. He also includes inside stories of some of the most iconic advertising in the last forty years.

The book places the reader in the company of a clever, funny, wise, humane raconteur, whose vast knowledge is conveyed lightly, and in ways that make the reader want to listen and learn.

Everyman’s England

A classic travelogue that brilliantly conjures 1930s Britain.

In this series of pen-portraits of England from the 1930s, Victor Canning ‘evocatively captures the pattern and colour of English life’ (The Bookseller), from Cumbria to Cornwall. Canning’s heart-warming and humorous observations of sleepy villages, pastoral scenes and busy industries are a delightful time capsule into life in England during the interwar years.  

‘What does the word England mean to you? To all of us England means something different, and yet I think there is for every man and woman some little corner which is more England than anywhere else…’

 

***PRAISE FOR EVERYMAN’S ENGLAND***

‘Wonderful… elegant, humorous, exuberant essays.’ Guardian

‘Evocatively captures the pattern and colour of English life.’ The Bookseller

‘Canning finds beauty everywhere, but never sentimentalises, and is consistently honest enough to highlight poverty and social inequality… Canning, at his very best when waxing lyrical about landscapes, offers vivid images of the English countryside…’ The Daily Mail

Deeper Into the Wood

‘A wonderfully personal evocation of the joys, hard work and meaning of creating a wood for wildlife, written with sensitivity and care. A delightful read.’ Stephen Moss, author of The Robin: A Biography

Over twenty years ago, Ruth Pavey bought four acres of scrub woodland above the Somerset Levels and set out to improve the lush haven for birds, insects and all manner of wildlife. Beneath the shade of the trees she spent two decades planting, she now reflects on the fate of her wood.

As steward, she has witnessed nature’s forces shifting and the abundance of species dwindling rapidly. When the rabbits suddenly vanished, she knew it was time to take a closer look at the undergrowth and what she could do to preserve the legacy of the wood for generations to come.

Deeper Into the Wood recounts a year in the life of an amateur naturalist working with wildlife experts to interpret the language of the land. Ruth’s hand-drawn illustrations accompany her lyrical prose, which demonstrates an appreciation for the local people and their history. This is one woman’s story of inspiration, conservation, and a love of place.

***PRAISE FOR DEEPER INTO THE WOOD***

A rare treat of a book that warms as it informs and leads us deep into the character of one small pocket of England. Ruth Pavey writes with wit, passion and precious little sentimentality.’ Tristan Gooley, author of The Secret World of Weather

‘Wonderful… how love for a small woodland and respect for its local history can enhance wildlife and enrich the human spirit.’ Nick Davies, author of Cuckoo: Cheating by Nature

‘Ruth Pavey spins a delicate web between the many branches of her little Somerset wood. Her closely observed changes of wildlife and the changing seasons, echo a growing awareness and concern for life on Earth itself. The author’s growth and metamorphosis into an amateur naturalist who has learnt to read the language of trees is profoundly inspirational.’ Gabriel Hemery, author of The New Sylva

‘Inquisitive and generous. Pavey shares the love of her wood, past and present, through a fascinating weave of its natural and cultural histories. This book is as companionable as it is interesting. Patrick Baker, author of The Unremembered Places

When In Doubt Be Nice

Peter Mead’s spectacular career in advertising began when he joined the despatch department of a large agency straight from school at the age of 16.

He fell in love with the business and his ambition and drive led him in 1977 to co-found Abbott Mead Vickers, which grew into one of the industry’s most respected and highly awarded agencies. In 1995 AMV BBDO became the largest advertising agency in the UK, a position it has held ever since.

When in Doubt Be Nice begins with the most important business lessons Peter has learnt from his years at the cutting edge of advertising, and tells how he became one of the legends of the industry. It reveals the secrets of his success, his beliefs about the right way to do business and the values on which he built his remarkable career, including the benefits of behaving not simply as a leader to those who work closely with him, but also as a guide and mentor.

Written with modesty and wit, it is an inspiring insight into the mind of a great businessman who used intuitive flair and an understanding of how those around him think to build and run an extraordinarily successful advertising agency.

Repeat Prescription: Hilarious True Stories from a Country Practice

Dr Sparrow is back, coping with more bizarre, macabre and hilarious situations. Following his successful debut with Country Doctor, he once more guides us through the daily rounds of the weird and wonderful in his practice on the Devon/Cornwall border.

What would you do if faced with the unsuccessful resuscitation of the wrong patient, being held at gunpoint as a suspected terrorist or confronting a blind man who refuses to stop driving? And what about the little old lady who presents you with a supermarket bag stuffed with £20 notes? Add to this, jets crashing on the runway, fleeting glimpses of the Royal Genitalia and the haunting tale of the suicidal stranger and an abducted child – and you will start to have some idea of the unpredictable life of Dr Sparrow.

Country Doctor: Hilarious True Stories from a Rural Practice

Have you ever had to decide what to do with an unidentified corpse by a Devonian cowshed when the herd is due in for milking? And how would you react if one of your patients was abducted by aliens?

If you are a GP it seems these are routine matters. From coping with the suicide of a colleague to the unusual whereabouts of a jar of Coleman’s mustard, this is the story of one rural doctor’s often misguided attempts to make sense of the career in which he has unwittingly found himself.

Dr Sparrow’s adventures would be utterly unbelievable were they not 100% true stories. His bedside manner may sometimes leave a little to be desired but, if you’re in dire straits, this doctor will have you in stitches.

Diary of a Rural GP: Hilarious True Stories from a Country Practice

Recently retired, Dr Sparrow reveals with refreshing candour and dark humour the most memorable experiences of his career as a rural GP. From sewing back on a patient’s chiselled finger on a call-out, and the emergency countryside delivery inspired by James Herriot, to suddenly remembering the body left in the back of a Volvo, and a small oversight that blew up the local crematorium, Dr Sparrow spares no blushes.

Things We Didn’t Talk About When I Was a Girl

Why would a good person commit a terrible act?

Fifteen years ago, Jeannie’s relationship with a close friend ended in rape. With the rise of the #MeToo movement, recurring nightmares of the event that plagued her as a girl have returned. To process her conflicted feelings of betrayal and take back control, she resolves to face her trauma head-on by interviewing her rapist.

Through their transcribed conversations and discussions with her closest friends, Jeannie’s compelling memoir explores how the incident impacted both of their lives, while examining the culture and language surrounding sexual assault and rape. Things We Didn’t Talk About When I Was a Girl is a necessary contribution to the wider conversation around sexual violence from a brave, new voice. 

***PRAISE FOR THINGS WE DIDN’T TALK ABOUT WHEN I WAS A GIRL***

A Time magazine ‘The 42 Most Anticipated Books of Fall 2019’ 

A Bustle ‘The 20 Best New Books for Fall 2019’ 

Bustle ‘10 New #MeToo Movement Books to Read in Fall 2019′

An Esquire ‘Best Fall Books of 2019’: ‘Perhaps the most important book of the season.’

A Nylon ‘34 Books You’ll Want to Read This Fall’: ‘Thought-provoking, unmooring and haunting.’

A Domino  ‘Best Fall Books of 2019: ‘A compelling, nuanced look at trauma and survival.’

A NetGalley UK’s Top Ten Books for October

‘Brave and compelling… Vanasco muddles through the silt of her thoughts to create a language for something we don’t talk about.’ The Paris Review, staff pick

‘With deep self-consciousness, courage, and nuance, the author reveals the inner universe of her survivorship… An extraordinarily brave work of self- and cultural reflection.’ Kirkus Reviews, starred review

‘A powerful memoir… a painful reminder of the ugly ways some men treat women, and Vanasco’s nuanced story will resonate with those who’ve endured sexual inappropriateness in any form.’ Publishers Weekly

 ‘Vanasco has written exactly the book we need right now. I wish everyone would read it.’ Melissa Febos, author of Abandon Me

‘A gorgeous, harrowing, heartbreaking book. Vanasco is whip-smart and tender, open and ruthless.’ Carmen Maria Machado, author of Her Body and Other Parties

A Mirror for Monkeys

Beneath the floorboards of a ruined house, an 18th-century memoir is discovered. It reveals the life story of William Congreve, the acclaimed English playwright. The lost manuscript is penned by his faithful servant, Jeremy, who tells how they lived together through fierce political division and triumphal nationalism in that era of war with France, the aftermath of the Glorious Revolution.

Upon his death a monument in Stowe is erected to honour Mr Congreve. Atop a slender pyramid sits a monkey peering into a mirror, a court wit seeing reflected the ironies of polite society folding in on itself as Whigs and Tories feud with scant ground for compromise.

Through the prisms of memory and art, award-winning author John Spurling reimagines this tumultuous period and brings to life historical figures Dryden, Vanbrugh, Swift, Pope and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu as never before. 

My Father’s Glass Eye

My Father’s Glass Eye is Jeannie’s struggle to honour her father, her larger-than-life hero, but also the man who named her after his daughter from a previous marriage, a daughter who died. After his funeral, Jeannie spends the next decade in escalating mania, in and out of hospitals – increasingly obsessed with the other Jeanne.

Obsession turns to investigation as she plumbs her childhood awareness of her dead half-sibling and hunts for clues into the mysterious circumstances of her death. It becomes a puzzle she she must solve to better understand herself and her father.

Jeannie pulls us into her unravelling with such intimacy that her insanity becomes palpable, even logical. A brilliant exploration of the human psyche, My Father’s Glass Eye deepens our definitions of love, sanity, grief, and recovery.